Love

And now these three remain: faith, hope and love.

But the greatest of these is love.

When we are trying to make sense of these times and to do and say whatever we can to make the world a better place to live, it can be challenging.  I believe that love will always be more powerful than anything that is not love.

There are so many examples of how goodness, even in the smallest acts of kindness, can change hearts and transform lives when done with the faith, hope, and love of God.

Faith, as small as a mustard seed, can move mountains.  You may be moving the mountain one stone at a time, but it can be done, with faith in a higher purpose and with others that have that calling.

Having just a glimmer of hope can make all the difference in emotional and physical healing.  We are moved when we see even the smallest example of encouragement offered to someone who needs it.  We need hope to believe in ourselves and others.  Hope keeps us going when life is hard.

Our attempts at love, no matter how meager, become so much more powerful when we let God love through us.  Like a single candle, love can light up the darkness.  Like a small stone thrown in the lake, love can create so many waves.  As with all the resources God gives us, God multiplies our love, no matter how limited it may seem, when we choose to love with grace and mercy, compassion and forgiveness.

When you think that your efforts, no matter how small, can’t make a positive difference, think of Margaret Mead’s quote, “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

Here is a song I wrote called “Small Wonders” about how something small can make a big difference.

Song

Send My Mail to Nashville

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Stacey K. Black, producer, director, editor, and singer songwriter, spent two years of her life creating the music documentary, “Send My Mail to Nashville”.  It’s an extraordinary movie and I was grateful to be one of the many songwriters she featured. Her film offers a powerful and touching inside look at the songs and stories by songwriters as they live and work in a city with an estimated 55,000 songwriters. Interviewing songwriters at all levels, Stacey thoughtfully shows the peaks and valleys songwriters go through.

The film does an excellent job telling the songwriters’ stories and the various ways they create, record, perform, and promote their music.  It is clear that Stacey genuinely cares for the songwriters she features.  She shows how fun, but also how challenging, making a living with music can be in “Music City”.  Filled with plenty of great, original songs and impressive performances, the movie features Trevor Finlay, Jennifer Friend, Kevin So, Joe First, Shashi Light, Jack Frisby, Stacey K. Black, Don Hillaker, Peggy Hustad, Joel Shewmake, Lydia Smith, and Steven Wylie.

“Send My Mail to Nashville” has been making the rounds with film festivals and will be released in the near future.  For more information, go to the movie’s Facebook page at

www.facebook.com/SendMyMailToNashville

 

Jill of all trades, master of many

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Stacey K. Black                       http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/staceykblack

 

What do Hedy Lamar, Oprah, Rita Moreno, Joan Chen, Florence Nightingale, Debbie Allen, and Laurie Anderson (and many other famous women) all have in common?  They are all Jill of all trades, master of many… women who are multi talented “Renaissance women”.  And we could add another woman to that list, Stacey K. Black, pictured above.  Stacey has been a top hairstylist for major TV shows, a film and TV director, a writer, a filmmaker, a singer, and a songwriter… and she loves telling people’s stories with all of those skills.

There are lots of example of people who have managed to be a generalist and a specialist.  They don’t have to be mutually exclusive.  There are many reasons remarkable, talented women like Stacey are able to achieve mastery of several different skills.

  1.  Although women traditionally only had a few choices for careers (nurse, secretary), the options for careers for women now are greater than ever.  Men have had those opportunities for centuries, so there are many examples of “Renaissance men”, but in recent history, women have been allowed to show this creative diversity as well.
  2. Like cross training in athletics enhances performance overall, learning one skill (such as writing) can help you learn another skill (like directing) more quickly and deeply than specializing may.
  3. If it’s true that it takes 10,000 hours to master a skill, we are living longer than ever before, so we have more time to learn multiple skills than we ever have before.
  4. We are more open as a society to changing careers than ever before, so we have more support and encouragement to try different careers.
  5. Many careers don’t require professional credentials to show mastery.  So, although you still have to go to medical school to be a doctor, you can discover how to write or make films with all kinds of avenues.  And technology is making it easier to learn those skills as well.

The opportunities are greater for all of us to be multi talented than in any time in history.  So, let’s recognize and be inspired by the creative potential of the generalist and the specialist, the women and the men, who continue to make this world a better, more innovative place to live!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two singers, same song

Here is the “guy version” of a song I wrote with a great songwriter, Scott Jarman.  The song is called “Chase an Old Memory Down” and I thought it would be fun to compare my version, with me singing at the Bluebird Cafe (see my previous post), with this version, which has a guy singing and a guitar playing, at mid-tempo…    Enjoy!

Two singers, same song

Here’s a song I wrote with a great songwriter, Scott Jarman, called “Chase an Old Memory Down”.  I got featured in a movie called “Send My Mail to Nashville” because the director, Stacey K. Black, heard me singing it in Nashville.  I thought it would be fun to compare my version with the one I recorded with a guy singing.  So here is my version…